Logan

Ep 50: Don’t Make me Turn this Podcast Around

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Here it is, our 50th episode! All three hosts, Paul, Jacob, and Matthew, come together to re-examine some of our favorite questions and discussions from past episodes. We talk about the Joker, different ways of understanding violence, when heroes can or should kill, humorous vs. serious portrayals of heroes, and plan for the eventual ascension of our robot overlords.

You can download the episode with a right click  and clicking “save link as” or subscribe by searching for Superhero Ethics on Itunes or on Stitcher.

Agree or disagree with what we talked about, or want to add your own thoughts? Let us know! You can find us on TwitterFacebook, or email us at superheroethics@gmail.com

Also of note- we were a bit punchy for this episode. It led to a great, and funny, discussion, but also a few slips of the tongue- including Matthew’s references at various points to “Chris Kapernick” and “Stuporman.” Please forgive those errors.

Here are the podcast episodes we referenced:

Ep 3: Suicidal Villains: Suicide Squad and the Nature of Bad Guys.

Ep 4: Vengeance!  Exploring Desperado

Ep 10: Killing President Luthor

Ep 19: Why so Serious? The Joker

Ep 24: Logan on Logan

Ep 33: Ethics of our Robot Overlords

Ep 39: Thor and the Value of Fluff

Logan on Logan

LoganShould heroes be clean cut and re-assuring, like Cap’, or messy and troubling, like Wolverine?  Returning guest Logan joins Matthew for a discussion of the movie Logan. They talk about the movie’s portrayal of violence, the power of pride in overcoming stigma, the death and renewal of hope, the danger of putting heroes on pedestals, and the lessons we can take from Logan to our own world, especially in this current political moment.

 

 

 

You can download the episode with a right click, or subscribe by searching for Superhero Ethics on Itunes or on Stitcher.

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Is Magneto Right?

DoesMagnetoIs Magneto a villain, or a hero? Can we agree with his goals, even if not his methods? How does the fight for mutant justice echo similar discussions in our own world? Paul and Matthew talk about Magento and the X-men movies, up to and including the recent, Logan.

 

You can download the episode with a right click, or subscribe by searching for Superhero Ethics on Itunes or on Stitcher.

What do you think? Should Magneto be the hero, not the villain? We’d love to hear your thoughts! Continue the conversation with us on Twitter or Facebook!

Logan: The Realities of Superheros.

Logan(Contains Spoilers for Logan)

I tend to get strange looks when I tell people I wish superhero movies were more realistic. I don’t mean I need the powers to be more realistic- striving for scientific plausibility in the chemical concoctions and alien tech that makes our heroes so powerful always seems like a fool’s errand.  The realism I long for is in the characters themselves. My favorite stories are about people with incredible powers dealing with the same emotions and realities of any of the rest of us, navigating how those superpowers do, and don’t, change the experiences of love, hate, fear, anger, violence and conflict that we all deal with.

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V for Dystopia

 

evey-vThis week, Paul and Matthew are joined by Logan Grendel, who talks with them about V for Vendetta, dystopian stories, and the ethics of violence. (It all ties together, we promise!)

“Dog man” Logan Grendel is a writer, artist, and activist born and raised in New York City. He is also a lifelong fan of comics, fantasy, and dystopian tales of all kinds. His own photo/graphic novel creation Harlequin’s Song was completed in 2006, and has never seemed more timely.

 

Urban Dog Care NYC is Logan’s dog-walking business and main source of dog stories, about which you shouldn’t ask unless you have several hours to spare. For a brief, humorous look at his findings, read his new book Putting Paws to Pavement.

 

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You can download the episode with a right click, or subscribe by searching for Superhero Ethics on Itunes.

We would love to hear your thoughts and responses.  Continue the conversation with us on Twitter or Facebook.