Superhero Ethics

Be Super, like Wonder Woman!

Wonder WomanEarlier this week I recorded a talk with Krystal Kara, founder of the Be Super Initiative. Unfortunately, the recording got terribly garbled, so I can’t post it. I’m working on transcribing it and should have that up for you all soon, but meanwhile i wanted to tell you more about her and her great organization.

 

Be SuperKrystal Kara is the creator of the organization Be Super. Be Super strives to use comic  book characters as educational tools to understand social justice issues. Be Super aims to show that every individual is a hero.

I got to meet Krystal at Wiscon recently, and was inspired by the work she and Be Super do.   In the attempted podcast, We talked in general about her organization and the work it does, and about the new Wonder Woman movie- what we liked, what we had trouble with, and the discussion Be Super hosted after a showing of the movie.  I hope to have the transcript up soon, but  in the meantime, check out  the great work they do!.

It’s a great program, check them out!

And speaking of Wonder Woman, let me share my favorite article I’ve seen about it so far, about how Princess Buttercup became the warrior-general who trained Princess Diana. 

 

LARPing! The ethics of role playing games

“First political larpingyou have to realize that it’s not just a game, it’s a community… In the end it’s each of us making the choice, not the character, of what’s going to happen; what we’re going to say, how we’re going to do it.”

Special guest, JP Bauer, has been playing role playing games for twenty years and live action role playing games for twelve. He is an outspoken proponent of stronger ethics in the role playing community.

 

You can download the episode with a right click, or subscribe by searching for Superhero Ethics on Itunes or on Stitcher.

The articles JP mentioned during the episode are listed below:

 

How have you navigated ethical questions in LARPs and role playing games We’d love to hear your thoughts! Continue the conversation with us on Twitter or Facebook!

A Fair Fight?

 

Fair Fight

What is the value in fighting fair? Paul and Matthew explore the trope of the Fair Fight, looking at its value and its problems. What does a hero do, when the opponent refuses to follow the rules? If one side follows rules that the other ignores, is that a virtue that will inspire others, or a weakness for an opponent to exploit? We explore these questions in regard to Iron Fist, Firefly, superhero movies in general, and our current political situation?

You can download the episode with a right click, or subscribe by searching for Superhero Ethics on Itunes or on Stitcher.

 

 

 

 

Should our heroes fight fair? Should we? We’d love to hear your thoughts! Continue the conversation with us on Twitter or Facebook!

 

 

Logan: The Realities of Superheros.

Logan(Contains Spoilers for Logan)

I tend to get strange looks when I tell people I wish superhero movies were more realistic. I don’t mean I need the powers to be more realistic- striving for scientific plausibility in the chemical concoctions and alien tech that makes our heroes so powerful always seems like a fool’s errand.  The realism I long for is in the characters themselves. My favorite stories are about people with incredible powers dealing with the same emotions and realities of any of the rest of us, navigating how those superpowers do, and don’t, change the experiences of love, hate, fear, anger, violence and conflict that we all deal with.

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Time to Stop Being Gordon and start being Batman

gordon-and-batmanI have a long history of mixed feelings about vigilante superheroes. I cheer for Batman, and I loved watching Dexter, but for a long time i was troubled by the idea of someone, anyone, deciding that they knew better than everyone else what was right and true and good, and could therefore break the law in order to serve their idea of justice. It wasn’t the breaking the law part that bothered me- I think civil disobedience is one of the most important parts of democracy. My concern was with the idea that one person could decide that they knew best, and therefore had the moral right to go above and beyond the system. I believed that, flawed as it might be, a functioning democratic system of justice was always better than one individual.

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